The process of cellular senescence, which is characterized by stable cell cycle arrest, is strongly associated with dysfunctional cellular metabolism and circadian rhythmicity, both of which are reported to result from and also be causal to cellular senescence. As a result, modifying any of them—senescence, metabolism, or the circadian clock—may affect all three simultaneously. Obesity accelerates aging by disrupting the homeostasis of reactive oxygen species (ROS) via an increased mitochondrial burden of fatty acid oxidation. As a result, if senescence, metabolism, and circadian rhythm are all linked, anti-obesity treatments may improve metabolic regulation while also alleviating senescence and circadian rhythm. Vutiglabridin is a small molecule in clinical trials that improves obesity by enhancing mitochondrial function. We found that chronic treatment of senescent primary human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs) with vutiglabridin alleviates all investigated markers of cellular senescence (SA-β-gal, CDKN1A, CDKN2A) and dysfunctional cellular circadian rhythm (BMAL1) while remarkably preventing the alterations...

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