Greenhouse gas emissions from Western Australia's sheep flock account for 26% of the state's agricultural emissions, principally as a result of enteric methane emissions. A decrease in emissions between 2005 and 2019 can be partly explained by a 44% drop in sheep numbers over that period, but less is known about potential changes in the methane intensity of sheepmeat and wool kg CO2 equivalents/kg product. Using the livestock systems modelling software GrassGro™, we assessed the changes in methane intensity of sheepmeat and wool produced in two major sheep-producing regions in Western Australia. We also evaluated a series of future scenarios. Our results demonstrate that the observed emissions reductions are largely a result of a decrease in flock size, although methane intensity has also decreased somewhat by 11.1%. Simulation of future trajectories indicates that methane intensity could be as much as 18.8% lower by 2030, compared to 2005, with further reductions...

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