High salinity is an effective measure to preserve kelp, but salted kelp can still deteriorate after long-term preservation. In order to clarify the key conditions and microbial behavior of salted kelp preservation, 10% (S10), 20% (S20), and 30% (S30) salt concentrations were evaluated at 25 °C (T25) and 4 °C (T4). After 30 days storage, these salted kelps showed different states including rot (T25S10), softening (T25S20), and undamaged (other samples). By detecting polysaccharide lyase activity and performing high-throughput sequencing of the prokaryotic 16S rRNA sequence and metagenome, we found that deteriorated kelps (T25S10 and T25S20) had significantly higher alginate lyase activity and bacterial relative abundance than other undamaged samples. Dyella, Saccharophagus, Halomonas, Aromatoleum, Ulvibacter, Rhodopirellula, and Microbulbifer were annotated with genes encoding endonuclease-type alginate lyases, while Bacillus and Thiobacillus were annotated as the exonuclease type. Additionally, no alginate lyase activity was detected in undamaged...

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