The hypothesis was that saccharides mediate interactions between surface-active components and that this will have an impact on foam decay during the drying process. Static light scattering was performed to determine changes in interactions between the foam stabilizer on a molecular level. Furthermore, pendant drop and oscillating drop measurements were performed to examine the surface tension and surface rheology. Foams were dried in conventional dryers as well as microwave-supported vacuum dryers. Final foam properties were determined. It was shown that the addition of sugars, often added as protective substances for sensitive organic molecules, resulted in lower repulsion between different types of surface-active components, namely polysorbate 80 and β-lactoglobulin (β-lg). Differences in impact of the types of sugars and between different types of surfactant, protein, and small molecules were observed influencing the foam decay behavior. The interfacial properties of polysorbate 80 and β-lg were influenced by the type of the used...

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