Metals reach humans through food and drinking water intake and inhalation of airborne particles and can have detrimental health effects in particular for children. The metals presented here (lead, cadmium, chromium, and mercury) could lead to toxic effects such as neurotoxicity, mutagenicity, and have been classified as (possible) carcinogens. Using population representative data from the German Environmental Survey 2014-2017 (GerES V) from 3-to 17-year-old children on lead and cadmium in blood (n=720) and on cadmium, chromium, and mercury in urine (n=2250) we describe current internal exposure levels, and socio-demographic and substance-specific exposure determinants. Average internal exposure (geometric means) in blood was 9.47 μg/L for lead and below 0.06 μg/L (limit of quantification) for cadmium, and in urine 0.072 μg/L for cadmium, 0.067 μg/L for mercury, and 0.393 μg/L for chromium, respectively. Younger children have higher concentrations of lead and chromium compared to 14-17-year-old adolescents, and boys have slightly higher mercury...

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