Various food products distributed throughout the cold chain can present a health risk for consumers due to the presence of psychrotolerant B. cereus group species that possess enterotoxin genes and antibiotic resistance. As these bacteria can grow at the low temperatures used in the food industry, this study evaluated the antimicrobial efficacy of acetic acid, sodium hypochlorite, and thermal treatments for inhibition of psychrotolerant strains and the effect that differences in activation temperature (30 °C and 10 °C) have on their efficacy. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC), and bacterial growth assay of acetic acid and thermal treatment showed an equal or higher antimicrobial efficacy in isolates activated at 10 °C than in those activated at 30 °C. In particular, psychrotolerant strains from the B. cereus group were completely eliminated with 0.25% acetic acid, regardless of the activation temperature. The possibility of tolerance was determined by observing...

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