Aims. The gastro-intestinal tract is a major reservoir of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL) producing Escherichia coli. Bacillus spores may be used as probiotics to decrease digestive colonization by ESBL-E. coli. Our aim was to assess the in vitro and in vivo activity of new Bacillus strains against ESBL-E. coli. Methods and Results. We screened the in vitro activity of 50 Bacillus strains against clinical isolates of ESBL-E. coli and selected B. subtilis strains CH311 and S3B. Both strains decreased ESBL-E. coli titers by 4 log10 CFU L-1 in an in vitro model of gut content, whereas the B. subtilis CU1 strain did not. In a murine model of intestinal colonization by ESBL-E. coli, CH311 and S3B did not decrease fecal titers of ESBL-E. coli. Ten sequences of putative antimicrobial peptides were identified in the genomes of CH311 and...

You do not currently have access to this content.