Background. Empowerment interventions facilitate individuals, organisations and communities to gain better control over their health. They are distinctly different from traditional behaviour-change models and encourage participants to set their own health priorities and agenda. Current evidence suggests empowerment interventions are efficacious for smoking, sexual and mental health outcomes. However, empowerment in childhood obesity is under-researched. Aim. To systematically analyse the evidence for empowerment approaches in childhood weight management. Methods. A comprehensive search strategy was applied to five databases and identified 29 relevant papers. Evidence was appraised using The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Quality Criteria Checklist and NHMRC Levels of Evidence. Results. Almost all studies rated positive (n=25) and four rated neutral. Overall, the evidence body rated "B". 72% of the 3318 participants included in this review were from underserved backgrounds, highlighting the unique ability of empowerment interventions to successfully engage priority populations-a persistent barrier in current healthy weight research....

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