Introduction. Perceived and actual access to healthy foods may differ in urban areas, particularly among Black people. We assessed the effect of objective and perceived neighborhood food access on self-reported cardiovascular disease (CVD) among Black people living in areas of high risk and low risk for the disease in Atlanta, Georgia. We hypothesized that perceived and objective food access would independently predict self-reported CVD. Methods. We used survey data from the Morehouse-Emory Cardiovascular (MECA) Center for Health Equity Study. Study participants consisted of 1,402 Black adults, aged 35 to 64, residing in urban Atlanta census tracts with high rates or low rates of CVD. We assessed perceived neighborhood healthy food access by self-reported selection and quality of produce and low-fat food options. We assessed objective food access by the 2015 US Department of Agriculture Food Access Research Atlas. Low access was defined as census tracts with at least 500 people...

You do not currently have access to this content.