High-pressure-jet (HPJ) processing of various dairy systems has been shown to disrupt fat droplets and casein micelles and cause a strong association between fat and casein proteins. The present work seeks to better describe this association between fat and casein using a model milk formulated from confectionary coating fat (3.6% wt/wt), micellar casein (3.4% wt/wt), and water (93% wt/wt), which was then pasteurized, homogenized, and then either HPJ-treated (400 MPa) or not (non-HPJ-treated, control). Upon ultracentrifugation, fat in the non-HPJ-treated model milk creamed due to its low density. In the HPJ-treated model milk, fat precipitated with protein into a thick bottom layer upon ultracentrifugation, reflecting a strong association between protein and fat. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and time-domain nuclear magnetic resonance of the non-HPJ-treated model milk revealed fat in 2 physical states: (1) fat that is physically similar to the bulk fat and (2) fat that was in smaller droplets...

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